Tenn State AOB at The Honda Battle of The Bands

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TSU Mentioned on NPR Concerning Race Relations

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At another table, Keonna Hill starts talking about her plan to make sure she gets into her dream school — Tennessee State University. Hill says she’s also concerned about the protests sweeping college campuses across the country.

“Everywhere you go, there’s racism and its a problem. I am scared, I mean what kid wouldn’t be scared,” Hill says.

Tennessee State University is a historically black college and Hill says she expects the campus atmosphere there to be comfortable.

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Listen to the Segment here

Will HBCUs see a Benefit due to the Racial Unrest on College Campuses?

Vote For Ms. Jessica Robinson in the #HelloToHealthy Natural Hair College Model Contest

newtsugirlJessica Robinson is a Cardio Respiratory Care Sciences major at Tennessee State University that is competing against 5 other beautiful ladies from 5 different HBCU’s in the South in the #HelloToHealthy natural hair college model contest by Creme of Nature. Today is the last day to vote! Vote Jessica Robinson! Grand Prize is an all expense paid trip to New York City, A Photo Shoot, $250 Book Scholarship, a Makeover, and a Feature in a Hair Magazine! Comment, Like, Share, Repost, Tweet, But more importantly VOTE!

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TSU Professers Says Clean Power Plan will benefit Tennessee minorities

For the past year, a team of Tennessee State University students and I have been investigating the air quality in and around the Cayce Place community as participants in an Environmental Protection Agency research project.

Low-income and minority communities such as Cayce Place are often the hardest hit by the effects of air pollution and climate change.

The EPA’s new Clean Power Plan will, for the first time ever, limit power plant releases of carbon dioxide, particulate matter and related pollutants such as ozone.

Forty percent of the U.S. population living near power plants are people of color — so the plan will greatly benefit these communities. It will reduce incidences of asthma and other pollution-related illnesses, as well as create thousands of new jobs and save families money on utility and medical bills.

Yet, despite findings from several independent organizations showing how the Clean Power Plan will benefit low-income and minority communities, the National Black Chamber of Commerce released a report earlier this year misrepresenting its impacts. The report, funded by special interest groups seeking to preserve the bottom line for fossil fuel companies, alleges — wrongly — that the plan will harm African- American and Hispanic families.

By spreading misinformation, the National Black Chamber of Commerce is risking the health of thousands of children of color in Tennessee and across the country.

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TSU Student Creates Keep Hope Alive Scholarship

Guy Stanford, a Clarksville native, dreams of saving the world one day. He just decided to start that process on a smaller scale.

The 19-year-old Tennessee State University student began his own scholarship fund, named the Guy Stanford Keep Hope Alive Scholarship, that awards area students who did not qualify for the state’s Hope Scholarship, a one-time grant to help pay for expenses related to attending college.

“It’s just my way of giving back,” Stanford said, a graduate of Kenwood High School. “I love Clarksville. Everybody here.”

“ … I’m only 19 but if I’m in a position where I can help, I can help. Especially in my home town.”

Approximately 25 applicants’ submitted essays for the award this year before Stanford selected two, Daisalynn Iris and Aaliyah Bass, to receive a $750 check each.

“ … Saving Hope is not what the Hope is. With the Hope you get $1,500 a semester and this is a one-time grant. But this is like half your housing right here. It’s no $1,500 a semester but it’s a start.”

That start is particularly important to award recipient Bass, a fellow TSU student with Stanford.

“It actually means a lot, just knowing it’s a young adult doing stuff to help other young adults. It’s something great as well as it’s going to help school-wise, financially big time,” said Bass, who plans on using her award for psychology text book purchases. “I’m just really happy about that.”

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TSU Students apart of coalition that is challenging Tennessee over voter identification law

Students challenge Tennessee over voter identification law

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A group of Tennessee college students wants a federal court to require the state to accept their school identification cards as valid voter identification.

The out-of-state students attending Fisk University and Tennessee State University say in the lawsuit filed in Nashville on Wednesday they would like to vote in Tennessee but lack proper ID. Tennessee will not accept identification cards from other states nor will it accept student identification cards from Tennessee colleges and universities.

The students say the voter ID law is unconstitutional, violating the students’ right to vote and their right to equal protection. They note Tennessee does accept college and university identification cards issued by the state to workers, just not to students. And they say that obtaining a free Tennessee identification card that is accepted at the polls is a difficult and time-consuming procedure.

According to the lawsuit, student IDs from state schools were originally included as valid identification in the voter ID bill that became law in 2011, but they were taken out after lawmakers expressed concerns that student IDs were easy to duplicate.

The lawsuit claims that lawmakers did not offer any evidence that student ID cards are more vulnerable than any other accepted form of voter ID.