TSU Alum to be Chicago’s next Code2040 resident

 

Cheryl V. JacksonBlue Sky Innovation

BlackInTech founder Thomas K.R. Stovall likely will feel right at home in a residency program designed to boost diversity in the tech industry.

Stovall, founder of a micro-survey company, will become Entrepreneur in Residence at 1871 through the Code2040/Google For Entrepreneurs program.

The post, which hopes to expand opportunities for underrepresented minorities, comes with $40,000 in seed money, workspace at the tech hub, and training, networking and mentoring through Google and Code2040.

Stovall, 36, succeeds Riana Lynn, founder of FoodTrace, whose yearlong stint began last April.

Stovall created the BlackInTech series of events for black and Hispanic founders last year. It quickly proved to be popular. It has expanded to address corporate careers and is moving to match companies with investors.

The events typically feature panels of accomplished industry players and take place at 1871. BlackInTech also hosts regular networking functions.

The additional resources, combined with higher visibility, will result in a bigger impact faster, he said.

“Now I do it with a budget, a team of seven other EIRs (entrepreneurs in residence) across the nation, the entire weight of Google and Code2040 behind me, and national media now paying close attention,” he said.

The residency program, piloted last year in Chicago, Austin, Texas, and Durham, N.C., is expanding to Detroit, Minneapolis, Nashville, Tenn., and  Denver.

Code2040 is a San Francisco-based nonprofit that supports diversifying the tech workforce and entrepreneurs. It says black and Latino students earn about 20 percent of computer science degrees but make up just about 9 percent of the tech industry and less than 1 percent of tech company founders. Google For Entrepreneurs funds the residencies through a grant.

Stovall is founder of Candid Cup, a software firm that facilitates single-question, on-the-spot surveys to smartphones, essentially turning rooms of people into focus groups in short order.

The process provides a targeted group with a URL to access the survey — delivered on a coaster under a drink, on a digital screen or on a bathroom mirror decal. Visitors to the dedicated site see a question crafted by the organization seeking business intelligence.

Questions are limited to 140 characters.

An example from spirits company Diageo at a party during a National Society of Hispanic MBAs conference in Chicago: Does tonight’s experience impact your affinity for our brands?  In your opinion, tell us what “Diageo” is, and what makes us unique.

Stovall said answers helped Diageo — owner of Smirnoff, Guinness, Johnnie Walker and Captain Morgan brands —  realize respondents didn’t know that many brands they liked were in its portfolio.

“When you’re limited to the amount of characters you have, it makes you write and rewrite your statement until you’re asking the most bare-bones question you can ask,” said Stovall, who connected with a Tennessee State University engineering classmate who runs software development firm Sciberus to build the technology.

Cheryl V. Jackson is a freelance writer.

Twitter @cherylvjackson

Copyright © 2016, Chicago Tribune

BlackInTech founder Thomas K.R. Stovall likely will feel right at home in a residency program designed to boost diversity in the tech industry.

Stovall, founder of a micro-survey company, will become Entrepreneur in Residence at 1871 through the Code2040/Google For Entrepreneurs program.

The post, which hopes to expand opportunities for underrepresented minorities, comes with $40,000 in seed money, workspace at the tech hub, and training, networking and mentoring through Google and Code2040.

Stovall, 36, succeeds Riana Lynn, founder of FoodTrace, whose yearlong stint began last April.

Stovall created the BlackInTech series of events for black and Hispanic founders last year. It quickly proved to be popular. It has expanded to address corporate careers and is moving to match companies with investors.

Black in Tech panel part of ‘clean blueprint’ to help people of color
Black in Tech panel part of ‘clean blueprint’ to help people of color
The events typically feature panels of accomplished industry players and take place at 1871. BlackInTech also hosts regular networking functions.

The additional resources, combined with higher visibility, will result in a bigger impact faster, he said.

“Now I do it with a budget, a team of seven other EIRs (entrepreneurs in residence) across the nation, the entire weight of Google and Code2040 behind me, and national media now paying close attention,” he said.

The residency program, piloted last year in Chicago, Austin, Texas, and Durham, N.C., is expanding to Detroit, Minneapolis, Nashville, Tenn., and Denver.

Code2040 is a San Francisco-based nonprofit that supports diversifying the tech workforce and entrepreneurs. It says black and Latino students earn about 20 percent of computer science degrees but make up just about 9 percent of the tech industry and less than 1 percent of tech company founders. Google For Entrepreneurs funds the residencies through a grant.

Stovall is founder of Candid Cup, a software firm that facilitates single-question, on-the-spot surveys to smartphones, essentially turning rooms of people into focus groups in short order.

 

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Meet Tenn State Alum Danny Glover, Bernie Sanders’ National HBCU Outreach Director

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NBCBLK recently spoke with Danny D. Glover, the campaign’s National Historically Black Colleges and University’s Outreach Director, who’s spearheading initiative. He spoke about plans to visit about 10 HBCUs and why Sanders’ populist message resonates with minority students.

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Joseph D. Bishop Sr Named Police Chief at Tulane

New Tulane police chief Joseph D. Bishop Sr.

After a nationwide search, Tulane University has hired Joseph D. Bishop Sr. as its new police chief, effective Feb. 22. Bishop, a 35-year law enforcement veteran, comes to Tulane University from Vanderbilt University, where he serves as assistant police chief.

New Tulane police chief Joseph D. Bishop Sr. is a 35-year law enforcement veteran. (Photo provided by Joseph D. Bishop Sr.)

“Chief Bishop’s credentials are impressive. I believe that with his knowledge and experience, we can reach new milestones in our continued efforts toward progressive police strategies that will enhance the safety of our community,” Tulane University Police Department superintendent Jon Barnwell said.

Bishop began his civilian law enforcement career in 1978 with the Clarksville Police Department in Tennessee, later transferring to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office as a patrol deputy. In 1980, he was hired by the Metro Nashville Police Department as a patrolman. Rising through the ranks, he served in patrol/field operations, training, investigations, drug enforcement, S.W.A.T. and special operations.

He also has served as the director of the Office of Investigations and Compliance for the Tennessee Department of Corrections. He retired as deputy chief after 28 years of service with the MNPD.

Before assuming his current position at Vanderbilt, Bishop served as chief of the Columbia Police Department in Tennessee from 2008 to 2013. At Columbia he developed a management model for community service, incorporated an accountability-driven leadership model and reorganized the department. After five years, the department experienced heightened community partnership and five consecutive years of crime reduction.

Bishop graduated with honors from Tennessee State University with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. He also earned a master’s degree in public administration from Cumberland University.

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Tenn State Alumni Swahili Inspired Wedding Is Stunning!

nashville-tn-wedding-stephanie-sorenson-photography-saida-kenny-51-427x640

On the campus of Tennessee State University, Saida caught Kenny’s attention. Though it wasn’t until after both graduated and found themselves in each other’s presence at a mutual friend’s dinner did the two meet and sparks began to fly. Cut to four years later, the beautiful couple wed on September 5, 2015 in Nashville, not too far from Kenny’s very casual and personable proposal.

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TSU Alumnus Hired as Office of Institutional Equity Director at MSU

As part of its continued efforts to prevent, address and respond to sexual misconduct in the campus community, Michigan State University has hired the first director of its Office of Institutional Equity as well as a new Title IX and Americans With Disabilities Act coordinator.

Ande Durojaiye will be leading the OIE office, created in April to handle all discrimination complaints, including sexual assault and relationship violence. He is transitioning to MSU now in a part-time role and will start full time Nov. 30.

Prior to joining MSU, Ande Durojaiye served as the executive director of Equity, Inclusion and Compliance and Title IX coordinator at Florida Atlantic University, where he was tasked with leading all university initiatives related to equity, inclusion and civil rights compliance. Previously, he worked as an attorney with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. He earned a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, a master’s degree of higher education from Loyola University Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Tennessee State University.

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Rep. LaDawn Blackett Jones Speaks on the Proposal of the Freedom Bell in Stone Mountain Park

“I knew that something was coming, I was just hoping that something would include the flag coming down as well,” said Rep. LaDawn Jones, (D) Atlanta.

Jones said she met with Stone Mountain Memorial Association following her call last spring for a boycott of the park because it flies the confederate flag.

Her words sparked protests…. and counter-protests at the park over the summer.  But, the proposal for the Freedom Bell doesn’t address the flag issue… and adds another element.

“Dr. King was not a part of the civil war era, but I think including that is still showing progress,” said Jones. “It doesn’t have to be monument directly of Dr. King, but showing that liberty to starting to come to Georgia, I don’t think that’s a bad idea.”

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Former TSU Football Player Was Affected by The Charleston Shooting

Remembering Charleston church shooting victims

Sharonda Singleton was living what would appear to be a full and busy life.

She was also a reverend at Emanuel AME Church, and she was a member of a sporting family.

She was married to Christopher Singleton, who played football at Tennessee State University. And her son, Chris, who was born in 1995, plays baseball for Charleston Southern University.

Before fighting off tears as he hugged his teammates, Chris Singleton described his mother as “a God-fearing woman (who) loved everybody with all her heart.”

“Love is always stronger than hate,” he told reporters. “So if we just loved the way my mom would, then the hate won’t be anywhere close to what it is.”

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