TSU Alum to be Chicago’s next Code2040 resident

 

Cheryl V. JacksonBlue Sky Innovation

BlackInTech founder Thomas K.R. Stovall likely will feel right at home in a residency program designed to boost diversity in the tech industry.

Stovall, founder of a micro-survey company, will become Entrepreneur in Residence at 1871 through the Code2040/Google For Entrepreneurs program.

The post, which hopes to expand opportunities for underrepresented minorities, comes with $40,000 in seed money, workspace at the tech hub, and training, networking and mentoring through Google and Code2040.

Stovall, 36, succeeds Riana Lynn, founder of FoodTrace, whose yearlong stint began last April.

Stovall created the BlackInTech series of events for black and Hispanic founders last year. It quickly proved to be popular. It has expanded to address corporate careers and is moving to match companies with investors.

The events typically feature panels of accomplished industry players and take place at 1871. BlackInTech also hosts regular networking functions.

The additional resources, combined with higher visibility, will result in a bigger impact faster, he said.

“Now I do it with a budget, a team of seven other EIRs (entrepreneurs in residence) across the nation, the entire weight of Google and Code2040 behind me, and national media now paying close attention,” he said.

The residency program, piloted last year in Chicago, Austin, Texas, and Durham, N.C., is expanding to Detroit, Minneapolis, Nashville, Tenn., and  Denver.

Code2040 is a San Francisco-based nonprofit that supports diversifying the tech workforce and entrepreneurs. It says black and Latino students earn about 20 percent of computer science degrees but make up just about 9 percent of the tech industry and less than 1 percent of tech company founders. Google For Entrepreneurs funds the residencies through a grant.

Stovall is founder of Candid Cup, a software firm that facilitates single-question, on-the-spot surveys to smartphones, essentially turning rooms of people into focus groups in short order.

The process provides a targeted group with a URL to access the survey — delivered on a coaster under a drink, on a digital screen or on a bathroom mirror decal. Visitors to the dedicated site see a question crafted by the organization seeking business intelligence.

Questions are limited to 140 characters.

An example from spirits company Diageo at a party during a National Society of Hispanic MBAs conference in Chicago: Does tonight’s experience impact your affinity for our brands?  In your opinion, tell us what “Diageo” is, and what makes us unique.

Stovall said answers helped Diageo — owner of Smirnoff, Guinness, Johnnie Walker and Captain Morgan brands —  realize respondents didn’t know that many brands they liked were in its portfolio.

“When you’re limited to the amount of characters you have, it makes you write and rewrite your statement until you’re asking the most bare-bones question you can ask,” said Stovall, who connected with a Tennessee State University engineering classmate who runs software development firm Sciberus to build the technology.

Cheryl V. Jackson is a freelance writer.

Twitter @cherylvjackson

Copyright © 2016, Chicago Tribune

BlackInTech founder Thomas K.R. Stovall likely will feel right at home in a residency program designed to boost diversity in the tech industry.

Stovall, founder of a micro-survey company, will become Entrepreneur in Residence at 1871 through the Code2040/Google For Entrepreneurs program.

The post, which hopes to expand opportunities for underrepresented minorities, comes with $40,000 in seed money, workspace at the tech hub, and training, networking and mentoring through Google and Code2040.

Stovall, 36, succeeds Riana Lynn, founder of FoodTrace, whose yearlong stint began last April.

Stovall created the BlackInTech series of events for black and Hispanic founders last year. It quickly proved to be popular. It has expanded to address corporate careers and is moving to match companies with investors.

Black in Tech panel part of ‘clean blueprint’ to help people of color
Black in Tech panel part of ‘clean blueprint’ to help people of color
The events typically feature panels of accomplished industry players and take place at 1871. BlackInTech also hosts regular networking functions.

The additional resources, combined with higher visibility, will result in a bigger impact faster, he said.

“Now I do it with a budget, a team of seven other EIRs (entrepreneurs in residence) across the nation, the entire weight of Google and Code2040 behind me, and national media now paying close attention,” he said.

The residency program, piloted last year in Chicago, Austin, Texas, and Durham, N.C., is expanding to Detroit, Minneapolis, Nashville, Tenn., and Denver.

Code2040 is a San Francisco-based nonprofit that supports diversifying the tech workforce and entrepreneurs. It says black and Latino students earn about 20 percent of computer science degrees but make up just about 9 percent of the tech industry and less than 1 percent of tech company founders. Google For Entrepreneurs funds the residencies through a grant.

Stovall is founder of Candid Cup, a software firm that facilitates single-question, on-the-spot surveys to smartphones, essentially turning rooms of people into focus groups in short order.

 

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TSU President To Award Seniors $3M In Scholarships

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee State University President Glenda Baskin Glover is awarding $3 million in scholarships to high school seniors in West Tennessee and northern Mississippi.

Glover is expected to present the scholarships to students at a special reception on Wednesday in Memphis, her hometown.

Scholarship recipients were recommended by their high school guidance counselors.

TSU’s office of admissions and recruitment worked closely with them to identify high-achieving students based on grade point average and ACT/SAT test scores.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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[Tigers on the Rise] Dr. Angela Chapman named Massillon City Schools Curriculum Director

The Massillon City Schools Board of Education announced the hiring of Dr. Angela Chapman as the school district’s curriculum director and Dr. Lynne Kulich as coordinator of instruction.

“We have hit a home run by attracting these two dynamic persons to Massillon,” said Superintendent Rik Goodright. “I truly believe they will continue to lead Massillon to great things. Their knowledge and expertise will provide excellent direction as we prepare for the common core state standards.”

Chapman comes to Massillon from Nashville, where she was an elementary school principal.

Throughout her 16-year career, Chapman has been both teacher and principal in districts in Ohio, Indiana and Tennessee, focusing on curriculum development and student achievement. She received her bachelor of science in elementary education from The University of Akron, her master’s in curriculum and instruction from Ashland University and her doctorate in curriculum and instruction from Tennessee State University.

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[Education Advocate] TSU Alum Tenicka Boyd

TenickaBoyd_pic

Name: Tenicka Boyd
Class: 2006
Occupation: Director of Organizing, StudentsFirstNY  
Hometown: Milwaukee, WI 

Tenicka serves as the Director of Organizing for StudentsFirstNY. She joined SFNY from the Obama Administration, where she served at the U.S. Department of Education in the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. Tenicka joined the Administration as Assistant to the Executive Director of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness. Previously, she spent years as an organizer: in Flint, Michigan, as Lead Community Organizer for Flint Area Congregations Together and as an organizer for the Obama campaign in 2008; and in Alexandra, Virginia as Regional Healthcare Reform Organizer for Tenants and Workers United, where she helped build a statewide coalition in support of progressive healthcare reform.

 Tenicka earned a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Tennessee State University and a Masters of Science in U.S. History and Public Policy from the University of Michigan. She resides in Brooklyn with her college sweetheart, Calvin, and her daughter (a NYC public school student).

Education Advocacy Work

I have a pretty exciting job. I manage the largest education reform organizing effort in the state of New York. I have a team of nearly 30 who have 1-1s, house meetings, daily community meetings, leadership sessions, and trainings in some of the lowest performing school districts in New York City. Our organizing effort is still fairly new but we are seeing a tremendous response. Education policy is nuanced and complicated, but this is truly exciting work. When I walk in a church basement with 30 parents from the same school sitting together discussing ways to increase the quality of teaching in their local elementary school, I know that we are winning.

Why I Came to StudentsFirstNY

I truly believe that in order to reform education in this country, we have to be willing to challenge the status quo.  I have always believed in putting students first. I love working with a team everyday that engages and motivates real parents around issues that are deeply important to them.

Areas We Organize Around

We discuss issues of teacher quality that many parents are concerned about. We know that poverty is an issue in many of the communities we serve, but we also know that teachers are the largest in school factor that can contribute to changing the life trajectory for many of the students. We also talk to parents about school choice. Though we organize primarily traditional public school parents, many of them see high performing charter schools as a viable option.

How can TSU be a gap to serve underserved groups in education?

I love my alma mater. I believe that this institution and my amazing professors truly contributed to my love for service. TSU has always been a gap to serving low-income communities and students of color especially in education. TSU should continue to create high standards, field experience, and rigor for soon-to-be teachers. The requirement and retention of men of color is also important and a great role for TSU. TSU and many institutions can continue to uphold the teaching profession as one of prestige and honor.

How can future teachers best prepare themselves to teach 21st Century skills such as creativity and critical thinking?

I always think it’s a great idea for teachers to set clear and high expectations for their students regardless of their background. But what is most effective is academic rigor which allows students to do most of the talking and working while teachers are asking rigorous questions and pushing students for top-quality oral responses and well thought out written work. To foster creativity, especially in low-income communities, a good idea is to be challenging in the ways we approach subjects. Being culturally competent and employing real life examples for our children is an amazing starting point to foster creativity. I believe it is so important to emphasize the process rather than product. Using creative problem solving was always the best way that I learned as a student.
Could you highlight some recent NY or national developments in education that you are excited about?
I’m really excited about the growing interest of parents in the fight for education equity. And it’s really great to see foundations and people investing time and resources in fostering those efforts. Parent Revolution in California is such an amazing organization that is engaging parents in policy changes. I’m extremely excited about the new policies that will come from the Obama administration’s Dept. of Education as well as the new teacher evaluation system in New York.

 

A new university funding model: Not bums in seats, but students who graduate

 

RICHARD RHODA

The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Apr. 03 2013, 7:10 AM EDT

Last updated Wednesday, Apr. 03 2013, 7:10 AM EDT

Across the U.S. and the world, higher education and government leaders have pointed to the exceptional need for a more educated citizenry and the central role higher education can play in improving people’s future. In Tennessee, that need is acute as our state’s public policy has for a long time sought solutions to address an undereducated population and the changing workforce and job skill demands of today’s economy.

To address these challenges, Tennessee passed the Complete College Tennessee Act (CCTA) in 2010 which ushered in a comprehensive reform agenda that sought to transform public higher education through changes in academic, fiscal and administrative policies at the state and institutional level. At the centre of these reforms is the need for more Tennesseans to be better educated and trained for an evolving workforce. Central to the CCTA is a long-range plan for Tennessee higher education that establishes the direct link between the state’s economic development and its higher education system. One of the primary policy levers for addressing the state’s educational needs is a new public higher education funding formula, which allocates the entirety of institutional operating dollars on the basis of outcomes – not enrollment.

The fundamental question at issue was on what basis should government allocate taxpayer funds to public institutions. For decades, Tennessee and virtually all other states answered that question with enrollment. As institutional enrollments grew, government funding increased, irrespective of outcomes, productivity or student learning. However, as the policy imperative in Tennessee changed in the CCTA from student access to educational attainment and workforce preparedness, then the methodology by which government funded institutions needed to evolve as well.

Tennessee has done exactly that as outcomes – degrees awarded, research conducted, graduation rates, etc. – have completely replaced enrollment in the allocation of government funding.

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TSU Professor, Drummer for country star Kellie Pickler injured in crash

Drummer for country star Kellie Pickler injured in crash

Please prayer for Gregg Lohman’s speedy recovery.